What are the Big Tax Penalties to Avoid in Retirement?

Nashville Tennessee Estate and Business Planning

Protecting a nest egg is tough enough. Don’t make the situation far worse.

PUBLISHED ON: April 22, 2021

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Building and living off a nest egg can be a challenge. However, you can make the situation worse, if you encounter some important laws for retirement accounts.

Money Talks News’ recent article entitled “3 Tax Penalties That Can Ding Your Retirement Accounts” says make one wrong step and the federal government may want some explanations. Here are the three penalties to avoid at all costs, when contributing to or withdrawing from your retirement accounts.

Excess IRA Contribution Penalty. If you put too much away in an individual retirement account (IRA), it can cost you. The IRS says you can (i) contribute an amount of money that exceeds the applicable annual contribution limit for your IRA; or (ii) improperly roll over money into an IRA.

If you get a little too anxious to build a nest egg and make one of these mistakes, the IRS says that “excess contributions are taxed at 6% per year as long as the excess amounts remain in the IRA. The tax can’t be more than 6% of the combined value of all your IRAs as of the end of the tax year.”

The IRS has a remedy to address your mistake before any penalties are imposed. You must withdraw the excess contributions — and any income earned on those contributions — by the due date of your federal income tax return for that year.

Early Withdrawal Penalty. If you take your money out too soon from a retirement account, you’ll suffer another potentially costly mistake. If you withdraw money from your IRA before the age of 59½, you may be subject to paying income taxes on the money—plus an additional 10% penalty, according to the IRS. The IRS explains there are several scenarios in which you’re permitted to take early IRA withdrawals without penalties, such as if you lose a job, where you can use your IRA early to pay for health insurance. The same penalties apply to early withdrawals from retirement plans like 401(k)s, although again, there are exceptions to the rule that allow you to make early withdrawals without penalty. However, note that the exceptions which let you make early retirement plan withdrawals without penalty sometimes differ from the exceptions that allow you to make early IRA withdrawals without penalty. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) Act of 2020 also created a one-time exception to the early-withdrawal penalty for both retirement plans and IRAs, due to the coronavirus pandemic. Therefore, coronavirus-related distributions of up to a total of $100,000 that were made in 2020 are exempt.

Missed RMD Penalty. Retirement plans are terrific because they generally let you defer paying taxes on your contributions and income gains for many years. However, at some point, the federal government will want its share of that cash. Taxpayers previously had to take required minimum distributions (RMDs) from most types of retirement accounts starting the year they turn 70½. However, the Secure Act of 2019 moved that age to 72. The consequences of failing to make RMDs still apply, and if you don’t take your RMDs starting the year you turn 72, you face harsh penalties. The IRS says:

“If you do not take any distributions, or if the distributions are not large enough, you may have to pay a 50% excise tax on the amount not distributed as required.”

It is important to undertstand that the RMD rules don’t apply to Roth IRAs. You can leave money in your Roth IRA indefinitely, but another provision of the Secure Act means your heirs must be careful if they inherit your Roth IRA.

Reference: Money Talks News (Feb. 18, 2021) “3 Tax Penalties That Can Ding Your Retirement Accounts”

Suggested Key Terms: Elder Law Attorney, COVID-19 (coronavirus), IRA, Roth IRA, Tax Planning, Retirement Planning

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